Make This Boom Tent: the Poor Man’s Bimini

It’s a cloudless mid-summer afternoon. You’ve had a great day of sailing but you’re ready to drop anchor, start dinner, and relax for another stunning sunset. You’ve been in the sun all day so some shade would be great but you don’t have a bimini on your sailboat. You don’t really want to go down…

Lazy Jacks for the Trailer Sailor

Lazy jacks can be one of the most complicated rigging systems on a trailerable sailboat but they have a simple function. That is, to cradle the mainsail when it’s lowered so that it doesn’t spill onto the cabin and cockpit. If you usually have another experienced crew member aboard, that person can gather and tie down…

Control Mainsail Draft with a Boom Downhaul

A boom downhaul is the last step toward adding trimmable controls for all three sides of the mainsail. The other two are the boom vang (leech) and the mainsail outhaul (foot). A boom downhaul replaces or modifies the boom tie-down that is standard equipment on most C-22s. A boom tie-down is the short length of line…

Make Your Boom More Useful with a Topping Lift

The standard equipment C-22 backstay pennant is simple and handy for holding up the boom when the mainsail is lowered. It also works fine to keep the boom more or less centered over the boat when docked or anchored. But it’s not very convenient for shorter crew members and it won’t help you when reefing…

Flatten Your Mainsail Foot with an Outhaul

As I mentioned at the start of the Boom vang solution post, my mainsail is a bit stretched out. The boom vang in that post was the first step at getting control over all three sides of the sail—the leech tension. Step two in this post is a trimmable outhaul for control over the foot…